Photoset

frenchchairs:

It is an unusual school in an unusual location and is run by an unusual teacher.

Rajesh Kumar is a shopkeeper by profession but spends hours every morning teaching around 80 children from the poorest of the poor in India’s capital.

The 43-year-old visited the construction of the Delhi transit station a few years ago and was disturbed by the sight of  many children playing at the site instead of attending school.

When he questioned the parents working at the sites they all said there were no schools in the vicinity and no one cared.

Consequently, his open-air class room was born - between pillars and beneath the tracks of the Delhi transit system, known as the Metro.

Every few minutes a train passes above, the children unperturbed by its sounds.

There are no chairs or tables and the children sit on rolls of polystyrene foam placed on the rubble.

Three rectangular patches of wall are painted black and used as a blackboard.

Anonymous donors have contributed cardigans, books, shoes and stationery for the children, as their parents cannot afford them.

One unnamed individual sends a bag full of biscuits and fruit juice for the pupils every day - another incentive for the children to turn up for their studies.

AWESOME.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

Link

lazybookreviews:

We published this completely mammoth investigatory piece on how students at Tufts have attempted to change how the university deals with survivors of sexual assault, and I am afraid that no one will actually read it, so I would really appreciate a signal boost from campus feminists and allies.

Signal boost.

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(via Religious Discrimination Has No Place in the Classroom | American Civil Liberties Union)

"Like any parents, we were deeply concerned when our son C.C. began getting sick to his stomach on the way to school each morning.

At first, we thought he had fallen ill. But we soon found out a far more disturbing truth—that our son, a Buddhist of Thai descent, was afraid to go to school because his teacher was chastising him in front of his peers for his Buddhist faith.

As we dug deeper, we discovered that our son’s sixth-grade curriculum at Negreet High included extreme religious indoctrination. The school itself was covered in religious icons. Christian prayer was incorporated into nearly every school event. And our son’s teacher routinely preached her biblical beliefs to students and tested the children on their piety with exam questions such as this one: “ISN’T IT AMAZING WHAT THE _____________ HAS MADE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

…And when we brought our concerns to the school superintendent, expecting compassion for our son’s treatment, we found none. She informed us that we live in the “Bible belt” and suggested that we transfer our son to another district school 25 miles away where, she claimed, there were “more Asians.”

…Please join us in calling on the Department of Justice to launch an immediate investigation into this unlawful religious discrimination so that no other child has to go through the harassment that our son has endured.”

(via Religious Discrimination Has No Place in the Classroom | American Civil Liberties Union)

"Like any parents, we were deeply concerned when our son C.C. began getting sick to his stomach on the way to school each morning.

At first, we thought he had fallen ill. But we soon found out a far more disturbing truth—that our son, a Buddhist of Thai descent, was afraid to go to school because his teacher was chastising him in front of his peers for his Buddhist faith.

As we dug deeper, we discovered that our son’s sixth-grade curriculum at Negreet High included extreme religious indoctrination. The school itself was covered in religious icons. Christian prayer was incorporated into nearly every school event. And our son’s teacher routinely preached her biblical beliefs to students and tested the children on their piety with exam questions such as this one: “ISN’T IT AMAZING WHAT THE _____________ HAS MADE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!”

…And when we brought our concerns to the school superintendent, expecting compassion for our son’s treatment, we found none. She informed us that we live in the “Bible belt” and suggested that we transfer our son to another district school 25 miles away where, she claimed, there were “more Asians.”

…Please join us in calling on the Department of Justice to launch an immediate investigation into this unlawful religious discrimination so that no other child has to go through the harassment that our son has endured.”

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"

Since taking office, Gov. LePage has made national news in his work to try to undermine Maine’s child labor laws. This is the same Governor who thinks twelve-year olds should be working, and who tried to roll back the minimum wage for students, as well as open the door to them working longer and longer hours. Thankfully, parents, teachers and advocates have (thus far) thwarted his efforts.

But, he’s at it again. This time, he’s attempting to undermine laws that date back to the mid-1800s when child labor laws were first developed.

"

Stop Child Labor Roll Backs - Diane Russell

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"

This would not normally be the sort of thing Americans United would pay much attention to. Private schools are free to set their own rules and standards – even if those policies sometimes don’t make sense.

But in this case there’s an important wrinkle: Faith Christian Academy is a voucher school. Prospective and current students are eligible for taxpayer-funded scholarships provided through Florida’s Step Up For Students program.

Like all voucher programs, Step Up For Students is funded directly by public money. Faith Christian Academy’s decision to expel a minority student over her natural hair isn’t just a quirky news story; it also reveals the implications of allowing public funds to go to sectarian schools.

"

A Hair-Raising Dilemma: Fla. Voucher School Threatens Student With Expulsion Over Her Hair | Americans United

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(via Indonesia is forcing girls to take “virginity tests” before they can go to high school.)
“A city on Indonesia’s Sumatra Island is about to force female students to pass a virginity test before they can go to high school.
Whether or not girls are virgins has nothing to do with their right to a good education. No male students are forced to undergo this humiliating exercise, one which shames sexually active teens and may expose rape victims to further abuse. 
If we don’t speak out, this policy will spread in Indonesia and surrounding countries. But Indonesian authorities aren’t expecting international scrutiny, which means it’s the perfect time to call on Education chief Muhammad Rasyid to stop this anti-woman campaign.”
PETITION SIGNED. Sick mother fuckers.

(via Indonesia is forcing girls to take “virginity tests” before they can go to high school.)

A city on Indonesia’s Sumatra Island is about to force female students to pass a virginity test before they can go to high school.

Whether or not girls are virgins has nothing to do with their right to a good education. No male students are forced to undergo this humiliating exercise, one which shames sexually active teens and may expose rape victims to further abuse. 

If we don’t speak out, this policy will spread in Indonesia and surrounding countries. But Indonesian authorities aren’t expecting international scrutiny, which means it’s the perfect time to call on Education chief Muhammad Rasyid to stop this anti-woman campaign.”

PETITION SIGNED. Sick mother fuckers.

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(via St. George, La.: One group’s quest for a new city could determine the fate of metropolitan Baton Rouge | NOLA.com)
"…It is a fight that threatens to put a barrier between urban Baton Rouge proper and an affluent suburban area to the south. The proposed new city, encompassing the Mall of Louisiana and critical commercial areas, would take with it a huge chunk of the East Baton Rouge Parish sales tax base, stripping vital revenue from the city and other parts of the parish.
The conflict also threatens to deepen long-standing divisions of class and race that continue to permeate life in East Baton Rouge Parish and simmer just below the surface of the fight over St. George. Though the campaign doesn’t talk about it in these terms, a predominantly white and middle-class area of south Baton Rouge is attempting to secede from a school system and a city that is majority African-American, and includes the poorest residents of the parish.
In East Baton Rouge Parish, “you have a separation that is both based on race and class, and this would really perpetuate that,” said Albert Samuels, an associate professor of political science at Southern University. “Some of these supporters of this effort to incorporate St. George and create a school district, they have the temerity to say with a straight face that this has nothing to do with race. But they’re acting as if the previous 50 or 60 years of history in this town have absolutely no consequence for where we stand now.”

(via St. George, La.: One group’s quest for a new city could determine the fate of metropolitan Baton Rouge | NOLA.com)

"…It is a fight that threatens to put a barrier between urban Baton Rouge proper and an affluent suburban area to the south. The proposed new city, encompassing the Mall of Louisiana and critical commercial areas, would take with it a huge chunk of the East Baton Rouge Parish sales tax base, stripping vital revenue from the city and other parts of the parish.

The conflict also threatens to deepen long-standing divisions of class and race that continue to permeate life in East Baton Rouge Parish and simmer just below the surface of the fight over St. George. Though the campaign doesn’t talk about it in these terms, a predominantly white and middle-class area of south Baton Rouge is attempting to secede from a school system and a city that is majority African-American, and includes the poorest residents of the parish.

In East Baton Rouge Parish, “you have a separation that is both based on race and class, and this would really perpetuate that,” said Albert Samuels, an associate professor of political science at Southern University. “Some of these supporters of this effort to incorporate St. George and create a school district, they have the temerity to say with a straight face that this has nothing to do with race. But they’re acting as if the previous 50 or 60 years of history in this town have absolutely no consequence for where we stand now.”

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"

Ham fails to acknowledge that over 97% of all scientists accept evolution (the number is higher among those working in the life and Earth sciences), and his colleagues are in the distinct minority. This further proves the point that evolution is not a scientific controversy; it is a political one.

Unfortunately, there is a large disparity between the scientific community and the public, as only 39% of American adults believe in evolution, a number considerably lower than almost every other developed country.

"

Standing on the Shoulders of Giants: How a Louisiana Student is Teaming With Top Scientists to Reform Science Education | I Fucking Love Science

WTF is wrong with this country.

Link

wilwheaton:

commodifiedsouls:

stoneagechronicles:

Your latest in North Carolina asshattery.

“It was a hard read,” said board chair Tommy McDonald, who voted in favor of the ban.

That says all you ever need to know about the people in charge of education there.

I truly feel terrible for the people who live in the old Confederacy, who *do not* want to party like it’s 1955.

The rest of them can go fuck themselves.

Yeah, I signed a petition about this.

(Source: thisisnotindia)

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(via Tell the Texas State Board of Education that science belongs in science textbooks, not religion. - People For the American Way)