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elfquest-wolfriders:

That one time the colours of Leetah’s coat did something.

There could be a whole separate tumblr on how fantastic their clothes were. Wendy Pini should’ve been a fashion designer.

(Source: elfquest.com)

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"It’s been eight months since the worst factory collapse in world’s history killed more than 1,100 workers. More than 125 global apparel brands have taken responsibility for the safety of the workers who make their clothes. But a few key corporations led by Gap are still standing in the way of real reform.

Gap, one of the top purchasers of Bangladeshi-made clothes, refused to sign a binding agreement to ensure that its factories are safe. Instead, it is actively undermining serious reform by promoting a non-binding corporate-controlled program that’s completely unaccountable to workers, and helping to convince other companies to do the same.

Gap has put publicity and profits ahead of workers’ lives — and now we have an opportunity to hold it accountable.

We’ve successfully nominated Gap for the Public Eye Awards, which Greenpeace and the Berne Declaration bestow on the world’s least ethical corporation each year. If Gap “wins” it’ll be a huge blow to its PR campaign and a reminder that the sham isn’t fooling anyone. But to make it happen, we need your vote. To vote, just click the link, scroll to the bottom of the page, and click the “vote for this case” button.

Click here to vote for Gap the worst corporation of 2013.

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potter-merlin:

petrichoriousparalian:

youfightthosefaries:

9 Problems with Women’s Clothing

And the worst part is that clothing companies do it because they know we’ll still buy their products.  But do we have much other choice?

and if you’re fat multiply these difficulties by 9000%

Amen. Also my bras cost 50 freaking dollars! I really don’t want to pay that much for some material to cover my breasts :/

I can especially relate to the part about sweaters!!!

(via fuckiminmytwenties)

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"

About a third of American women today are pear-shaped, her studies have revealed, with hips that are much bigger than their waists and shoulders. A third are rectangular, with thick waists. And just a third have a classic hourglass shape –even though that’s the shape that most companies use as a model for most of their patterns.

That means that at least two-thirds of females are failing to find clothes that look good on them.

"

Women’s Clothing Sizes: Is a 4 Really a 4? : Discovery News

What about us upside-down pears? ;) Okay, not really, but I do have broad shoulders and small hips. At least a pear shape is feminine.

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gothiccharmschool:

I refuse to call that red & black striped with red & black brocade corset “steampunk”. I also am very sad that there’s no chance of it fitting my buxom, short-waisted self. 

theblacklacedandy:

strange—and—unusual:

papa-scotch:

logicallunacy:

Steampunk Corsets from Corset-Story.com.

These actually look cool. My problem with most steampunk stuff is it seems like an excuse to put brass and gears on shit for no reason, but these actually have a sense of design to them.

GET ON MY BODY

MY STEAMPUNK SIDE OF ME IS SCREAMING “PLEASEEEEE”

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Why is it art if Nam June Paik puts TV monitors on the breasts of beautiful and talented Charlotte Moorman and it’s “silly” when Yoko Ono puts bells on beautiful, and probably talented, male models’ nipples?

Men of this generation are not used to seeing themselves objectified, while women are inundated with sexualized images of their gender. It’s not true that only males in the animal kingdom are adorned for mating rituals: Look at the embroidered, wigged and high-heeled men of Louis’ court, knights in damascened armor, and by extension, ornately worked swords and firearms. Even up to the 19th century, dandies dressed in long frocks tended to their moustaches and walked with jeweled canes.

As Lyta Alexander of Santa Sangre puts it, “Finally, a fashion line objectifying the male body as a focus for sexual desire…I remember numerous fashion lines with hearts, hand-prints and other similar symbols in the female breasts or buttocks, and nobody bothered to get enraged. Now the prints are on the male genitals, and lo and behold, righteous indignation…Go Yoko.”

"

Mirror Smasher: Yoko Ono’s Fashion for Men

Right on. I quite like the pants with the knees cut out.

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Holy crap, that is gorgeous.

Holy crap, that is gorgeous.

(Source: stickypearls, via fairytalesandfrills)

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miss-mary-quite-contrary:

Dame Julie Andrews-Edwards… she rocks in Hawaii. — Look magazine, December 28 of 1965.

What an awesome dress.

miss-mary-quite-contrary:

Dame Julie Andrews-Edwards… she rocks in Hawaii.
Look magazine, December 28 of 1965.

What an awesome dress.

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theclockworkballroom:

Topic 2: 14th April: Clockwork Ballroom
by Yi-Piao Yeoh
‘A Clockwork Ball needs clockwork couture!’
www.ypyeoh.blogspot.co.uk

theclockworkballroom:

Topic 2: 14th April: Clockwork Ballroom

by Yi-Piao Yeoh

‘A Clockwork Ball needs clockwork couture!’

www.ypyeoh.blogspot.co.uk

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fashioninhistory:

Jean-Phillipe Worth
The flowing S-curve silhouette of this dress is typical of its time. A water’s-edge pattern and plant pattern, lined up in a coordinated fashion, is appliquéd and embroidered onto thin silk chiffon and expressed three-dimensionally. The influence of Art Nouveau, a decorative art style popular from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th, is evident.It seems as if the plant pattern arranged on the skirt is of Japanese iris, blooming on the waterfront. This stylised pattern makes one recall the plants that appear in the sketch collection supervised by the artists Eugène Grasset (1845–1917) and E.A. Séguy (1889-1985) who were affected on Japonism. These stylised designs were first applied to textiles. Wooden furniture, flower vases, lighting, and various other products were later characterised by the Art Nouveau style.-Kyoto Costume Institute 

Everything about this dress is stunning.

fashioninhistory:

Jean-Phillipe Worth

The flowing S-curve silhouette of this dress is typical of its time. A water’s-edge pattern and plant pattern, lined up in a coordinated fashion, is appliquéd and embroidered onto thin silk chiffon and expressed three-dimensionally. The influence of Art Nouveau, a decorative art style popular from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th, is evident.It seems as if the plant pattern arranged on the skirt is of Japanese iris, blooming on the waterfront. This stylised pattern makes one recall the plants that appear in the sketch collection supervised by the artists Eugène Grasset (1845–1917) and E.A. Séguy (1889-1985) who were affected on Japonism. These stylised designs were first applied to textiles. Wooden furniture, flower vases, lighting, and various other products were later characterised by the Art Nouveau style.-Kyoto Costume Institute 

Everything about this dress is stunning.

(via chardonette)