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buzzfeed:

The 31 Realest Tumblr Posts About Being A Women

*stands up*

*salutes*

*applauds forever*

The biggest reason why I love Tumblr = the users.

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boogiemouse:

from the documentary “It’s A Girl”

JESUS CHRIST.

(via doctordisaster)

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halftheskymovement:

The two Indian girls who were gang-raped and murdered earlier this week lived in Uttar Pradesh, which state Congress leader Rita Bahuguna Joshi has said is “one of the worst places to be a woman.” With 200 million inhabitants, Uttar Pradesh is India’s most populous state, and its poorest –– more than 60 million people live on less than $1.25 a day.
According to the National Crime Records Bureau, an average of five women were raped every day in Uttar Pradesh in 2009.
Learn more at the Washington Post.

halftheskymovement:

The two Indian girls who were gang-raped and murdered earlier this week lived in Uttar Pradesh, which state Congress leader Rita Bahuguna Joshi has said is “one of the worst places to be a woman.” With 200 million inhabitants, Uttar Pradesh is India’s most populous state, and its poorest –– more than 60 million people live on less than $1.25 a day.

According to the National Crime Records Bureau, an average of five women were raped every day in Uttar Pradesh in 2009.

Learn more at the Washington Post.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

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Mark Lex Eros - The Burka Band - Meet your new rock generation (by Mark Lex Eros)

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Burka Blue : No Burka ! (by lisseman)

This is an anonymous (for obvious reasons), all-girl band in Afghanistan called The Burka Band. Talk about badasses.

Don’t bother reading the comments unless you feel like killing yourself…

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"The idea that sex is something a woman gives a man, and she loses something when she does that, which again for me is nonsense. I want us to raise girls differently where boys and girls start to see sexuality as something that they own, rather than something that a boy takes from a girl."

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (NPR)

I need to see her TED Talk. She rocks.

(Source: try-so-to-live, via youthxcrew69)

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(via Egypt women: Rights on paper, not yet on ground - The Washington Post)
"Women have only been allowed to be judges since 2007, and the new constitution guarantees their right to hold high positions in the judiciary. Yet a 2010 court decision barred women judges from the State Council, a powerful judicial body that regulates disputes between individuals and the state and reviews legislation.
After several women were rejected for membership on the council, Mervat Tallawy, head of the state’s National Council for Women, said that in January she wrote to the State Council demanding it take on women judges in light of the constitution.
The Council replied by saying her letter “violated appropriateness and manners” and it sought criminal action against the National Council for Women.”
Knew that shit was too good to be true.

(via Egypt women: Rights on paper, not yet on ground - The Washington Post)

"Women have only been allowed to be judges since 2007, and the new constitution guarantees their right to hold high positions in the judiciary. Yet a 2010 court decision barred women judges from the State Council, a powerful judicial body that regulates disputes between individuals and the state and reviews legislation.

After several women were rejected for membership on the council, Mervat Tallawy, head of the state’s National Council for Women, said that in January she wrote to the State Council demanding it take on women judges in light of the constitution.

The Council replied by saying her letter “violated appropriateness and manners” and it sought criminal action against the National Council for Women.”

Knew that shit was too good to be true.

Quote
"

In one study, participants were asked to rank the humor in various cartoon captions. Half of the captions had been written by men, and half by women. When not told who wrote what, the participants judged them almost equally funny. In fact, based on the scores given in this experiment, men are just 2.2 percent more likely to be funny than women. Yet 90 percent of the participants agreed with the stereotype that men are funnier. Talk about a mind-bogglingly huge difference in perception versus reality.

And it gets weirder — when the participants were asked which gender they thought wrote a caption, the funnier ones were almost always assumed to be by men and the less funny ones by women. This might be expected, considering their stated bias. Even when told the name and gender of the person who wrote each caption, within a short time the participants started misattributing the funny ones to men. In other words, even when they knew that women had written some of the funniest captions, the bias that men are funnier was so ingrained that it made them misremember who had written what.

"

4 Ways We’re Programmed to Think Women Aren’t Funny by Kathy Benjamin (via bestoffates)

This is one of the best articles of all time, and I will always reblog quotes from it.

(via thebicker)

(via doctordisaster)

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theatlantic:

Fighting Violence Against Women In India With Heavy Metal

To outsiders, the loud, aggressive world of heavy metal might seems like an unlikely place to find progressive politics. But any metalhead worth their leather can attest that the genre has often commented on society’s ills. Black Sabbath railed against the Vietnam War, Nuclear Assault offered apocalyptic visions of Reagan’s ‘80s, Sepultura howled scathing condemnations of the treatment of indigenous tribes in their native Brazil, Napalm Death addressed government failures and corruption, and more recently, Cloud Rat roared about sexism and urban blight atop a grindcore soundtrack. Thrash metal, in particular, has a long-running habit of tackling sociopolitical subjects with its rough barked vocals, wailing solos, and frenetic shredding.
In both a geographical and cultural sense, Mumbai seems about as far as one can get from the California Bay Area where the thrash-metal movement reached its apex. But the Indian band Sceptre offers proof of just how widely this style has spread. Inspired by their American forebears in Exodus and DRI and the music of classic German thrash bands like Kreator and Sodom, Sceptre recently celebrated its 15 anniversary, and is distinguished as one of India’s longest-running metal bands. Their latest recording taps into their genre’s liberal-leaning ideological tradition in a way that’s refreshing and urgent in modern India.
Age of Calamity is a concept album that deals with the plight of women in Indian society, and all proceeds from its sales will go directly to benefit a girls’ orphanage in Mumbai. Its haunting cover artwork was created by Indian artist Saloni Sinha, and depicts a weeping woman cradling her head in her hands, surrounded on all sides by crumbling walls and grasping shadows. It’s a powerful image, and in keeping with the theme, the band chose to work with a female artist.
Read more. [Image: Sceptre]


Rad. 

theatlantic:

Fighting Violence Against Women In India With Heavy Metal

To outsiders, the loud, aggressive world of heavy metal might seems like an unlikely place to find progressive politics. But any metalhead worth their leather can attest that the genre has often commented on society’s ills. Black Sabbath railed against the Vietnam War, Nuclear Assault offered apocalyptic visions of Reagan’s ‘80s, Sepultura howled scathing condemnations of the treatment of indigenous tribes in their native Brazil, Napalm Death addressed government failures and corruption, and more recently, Cloud Rat roared about sexism and urban blight atop a grindcore soundtrack. Thrash metal, in particular, has a long-running habit of tackling sociopolitical subjects with its rough barked vocals, wailing solos, and frenetic shredding.

In both a geographical and cultural sense, Mumbai seems about as far as one can get from the California Bay Area where the thrash-metal movement reached its apex. But the Indian band Sceptre offers proof of just how widely this style has spread. Inspired by their American forebears in Exodus and DRI and the music of classic German thrash bands like Kreator and Sodom, Sceptre recently celebrated its 15 anniversary, and is distinguished as one of India’s longest-running metal bands. Their latest recording taps into their genre’s liberal-leaning ideological tradition in a way that’s refreshing and urgent in modern India.

Age of Calamity is a concept album that deals with the plight of women in Indian society, and all proceeds from its sales will go directly to benefit a girls’ orphanage in Mumbai. Its haunting cover artwork was created by Indian artist Saloni Sinha, and depicts a weeping woman cradling her head in her hands, surrounded on all sides by crumbling walls and grasping shadows. It’s a powerful image, and in keeping with the theme, the band chose to work with a female artist.

Read more. [Image: Sceptre]

Rad. 

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)